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The Taylor Review was hotly anticipated, and the findings were finally published last month.

Commission by the Prime Minister back in October, the intention of the report was to take a look at how employment practices need to change in order to keep up with modern business models. It intended to address, amongst other things, employment rights in the gig economy, which is something that hasn’t been far from newspaper headlines over the past few years.

Since its publication, it’s come under some pretty heavy criticism. Jason Moyer-Lee, general secretary of the IWBG union said that it’s ‘wishy washy and full of fluff’. He raised issues with the panel involved in the compilation of the report, which is hardly surprising when you consider that a former Deliveroo investor played a role in its creation. He also picked holes in its legal accuracy, claiming that it’s full of errors.

But politically charged commentary aside, what does the Taylor Review mean for employers?

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Could Your Business Make Better Use Of Freelancers?

Thursday 8th June marks National Freelancers Day, and independent professionals up and down the country will celebrate the fact that they boldly work for themselves. It’s estimated that there are around 2 million freelancers operating in the UK, and they’ve had their fair share of press recently.

With the gig economy being a key topic of conversation, and firms like Uber and Deliveroo coming under scrutiny for how they treat the people working for them, it’s clear that the world of work is changing fast, and the face of employment is looking very different to what it did just a couple of years ago.

But what does this mean for your business?

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What will happen to the national living wage post-election?

Right now, nothing is set in stone, but it’s a bargaining chip that the key parties are using to sway more support over to their side.

Theresa May has pledged to increase the rate to around £8.75 per hour by 2020, and the Labour Party have taken things a step further by saying that under their control, it’ll be increased to ‘at least’ £10 an hour. Their manifesto states that this will cover all workers aged 18 and over, and not just those aged 25 and over, as is currently the case.

The Green Party are getting involved too, saying ‘the introduction of a minimum wage of £10 by 2020 is a necessary step towards tackling inequality and poverty’.

So where does this leave your business?

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